Monday, October 13, 2008

Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. On reflection this has to be one of the more misogynist books I've read. Not a female in it that isn't a castrating fiend, hellish domineering (castrating) mother, or a whore. The whores of course are the good guys. Never read a book before where the redemptive act by the hero was sexual assault of the villain. Putting that criticism aside, it was a good story with vivid characters. Bromden's voice was compelling, and I liked the image of the combine as the oppressive homogenizing forces in society working together. Haven't seen the movie, but by percolation I had an idea what to expect, so perhaps the suspense was a little spoiled. Anyway, I actually thought the ending would be sadder than it was.

2 comments:

Eveningson said...

Hey I like your site and have read all of your reviews. Good Stuff. I have read some and have a bunch on standby. I am currently reading something by Neal Stephenson (your snow guy) called crpto (something) and find it fascinating. I am in a Swedish Writer mode and also have on my bedside table, Henning Mankell, The girl with the dragon tattoo and some that I try to read one page such as L'histoire de Fribourg, Memoirs of Anais Nin, etc.

Garry

Eveningson said...

Thank you for your kind comments. I began reading several of what they call "polars" here, i.e. police novels, situated in different countries. There are many of course and some really good ones. Pepe Carvahlino (or word to that effect) in Barcelona, Commissario Brunetti and Zen from Italy and of course Henning Mankell's Wallander... I find these highly literate and a lens, as Nin would say, with which to emphasize my vice of escapist reading.....